High school project benefits elemenary school library

Students in Watertown-Mayer High Schools Advanced Woods class last year constructed these bins for picture books at the Watertown-Mayer Elementary School Media Center.

Students in Watertown-Mayer High Schools Advanced Woods class last year constructed these bins for picture books at the Watertown-Mayer Elementary School Media Center.

The Watertown-Mayer Elementary School library and media center has become a popular place for the school’s youngest students this year thanks to a project completed last year at the high school by students in an industrial technology class.

Students in Jim Erickson’s Advanced Woods class spent time during second semester last year constructing new bins for elementary school’s picture books. The bins allow the books to be displayed with the covers facing forward so students can flip through them and identify what they are much easier.

“Public libraries, like the one downtown, have these because it just doesn’t work for kids to check out picture books on a shelf,” elementary school media specialist Linda Quaas said. “All you see are the spines, and the kids don’t know what it is.”

Quaas said that because of the new bins, the school has seen a dramatic increase in the number of picture books being checked out by the younger students.

“Now they’re checking them out like crazy,” she said. “It has made a huge difference for our first and second graders. … Now the problem is that they’re all starting to fall over, because so many are checked out and they’re sliding down. But that’s a great problem to have.”

The bins were constructed by students William Hansen-Begg, Brandon Leaf, Austin Luedke, Scott Mellgren, Peter Schulenberg, and Dane Theisen, some of whom have since graduated. Quaas said the school was very thankful for their efforts.
“We thought they did a great job,” she said.

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