Norman sets world record for speed

Megan Norman, 19, of Norwood Young America set a world record for speed at 132.718 mph in the Super Stock Class at the National Straightline Snowmobile Racing event in Forest Lake on Feb. 9. Her father Ken, left, was the record-holder for the previous 15 years, setting records in that class in 1998 and 2009. Below, Norman accelerates down the track during her record-breaking run. (Submitted photo)

Megan Norman, 19, of Norwood Young America set a world record for speed at 132.718 mph in the Super Stock Class at the National Straightline Snowmobile Racing event in Forest Lake on Feb. 9. Her father Ken, left, was the record-holder for the previous 15 years, setting records in that class in 1998 and 2009. Below, Norman accelerates down the track during her record-breaking run. (Submitted photo)

If it can be said that anyone is born to break a record, Megan Norman of NYA might be that person.

From the earliest months of her life, Norman heard the whine of snowmobiles, smelled the vapor from high performance gasoline engines and felt the cool breath of winter afternoons spent on frozen lakes where her father Ken, already an established presence in snowmobile racing circles, would soon make a name for himself by crafting and racing the fastest sled ever modified in the Super Stock Class.

Flash forward 19 years to Feb. 9, 2013 in Forest Lake. Norman mounted that same 1998 Formula III Ski-Doo on which her father had set world records for speed in 1998 and 2009, hit the throttle and rocketed down the 1,000 foot straight line track with a peak speed of 132.718 miles per hour, breaking Ken’s 2009 record by two-tenths of a second.

“It was just a glorious day,” said Ken, who no longer races himself but handles the mechanical modifications that are so important for success in the Super Stock Class. “I just couldn’t believe it. We celebrated at the starting line. It was just spectacular, just great. Megan has been coming to the races since she was a baby. She started coming with me alone when she was 4 years old, so she grew up at the track. All the guys know her. They remember when she was a little kid playing around and bothering them.”

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