Mayer Lutheran student attends International Science Fair

Miriam Wilson of Chaska and a student at Mayer Lutheran High School, traveled to Phoenix, Ariz., the week of May 12 to attend the 2013 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF). She attended the fair as a Student Observer, participating in a caucus during judging and volunteering during outreach day.

During the week, Wilson heard from Nobel Prize Laureates including Douglas Osheroff, Laureate in Physics 1996, Adam Steltzner, NASA engineer at the Jet Propulsion Labratory and head of the team that landed Curiousity on Mars, and the futurist at Intel, Brian David Johnson. Wilson traveled to Arizona with seven other high school students from the Minnesota South Central/Southwest Regional Science Fair.

Miriam Wilson, second from left, stands with two other girls from the Minnesota South Central/Southwest Regional Science Fair, Rena Weis (far left) and Katie Morris (far right) as well as an ISEF finalist from Georgia, Julia Abelsky. The man is Douglas Osheroff, Nobel Laureate in Physics 1996.

Miriam Wilson, second from left, stands with two other girls from the Minnesota South Central/Southwest Regional Science Fair, Rena Weis (far left) and Katie Morris (far right) as well as an ISEF finalist from Georgia, Julia Abelsky. The man is Douglas Osheroff, Nobel Laureate in Physics 1996.

She was awarded the opportunity to participate at her local affiliated science fair in Mankato in February based upon her project “Assessing the Feasibility of Printing Custom Bones.” Wilson worked on her research at Mayer Lutheran under the supervision of LHS science teacher Gary Loontjer.

Each year, approximately 7 million high school students around the globe develop original research projects and present their work at local science competitions with the hope of making it to the Intel ISEF, a program of Society for Science & the Public.

The Intel ISEF, the world’s largest international pre-college science competition, where only the best and brightest — 1,600 winners of local, regional, state, and national competitions — are invited to participate in this week-long celebration of science, technology, engineering, and math. At the event, these young innovators, students from over 70 countries, regions, and territories, share ideas, showcase cutting-edge research, and compete for more than USD 4 million in awards and scholarships.

“I had a great time making new friends and learning a lot from students from around the world,” Wilson said. “Meeting Douglas Osheroff (Laureate in Physics 1996) was amazing! This is definitely an experience I will never forget.”

“Miriam is one of three students who took part in an independent research project this year,” Loontjer added. “Her project involving the possibility of growing custom-made bones has great potential for future improvements in medical care. Her hard work paid off and will continue to motivate her as she heads to Iowa State this fall to study engineering.”

“STEM (Science Technology Engineering Math) is a major part of our curriculum,” said Joel Landskroener, LHS’ Executive Director. “We are graduating more engineering students than ever and have witnessed kids’ interest in science and math increase. Mr. Loontjer and his group of talented students are doing great things.”

up arrow