Sun Patriot http://sunpatriot.com The Waconia Patriot, Carver County News and Norwood Young America Times Mon, 26 Jan 2015 19:30:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Anatomy of a Bumpy Start http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/anatomy-of-a-bumpy-start/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/anatomy-of-a-bumpy-start/#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 19:30:40 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?guid=94f686a84794ab679e8b58fb17929b66 The stock market has had bumpy start this year. Surprised? It mirrors January 2014. Lack of central bank stimulus, oil’s price decline and a few tepid reports are to blame this time.

Still, things worked out OK last year and may well this year. At Friday’s close, the Standard & Poor’s 500’s total return (price plus dividends) was down 0.26% for the month, although it has climbed back from the much-deeper mid-month low.

The early-2014 market suffered a sudden drop that puzzled investors spoiled by the easy, Federal Reserve-fueled returns of 2013. The prior year’s disproportionate gains led to quite a bout of portfolio rebalancing as institutions reduced equity exposure that previously rising stock prices drove into the red zones.

While 2014 wasn’t quite half as good as 2013, it was nonetheless enough to set off another wave of portfolio rebalancing. Mix in some legitimate fears about slowing economic growth with angst over falling prices, and there’s fright about what the coming year will bring. Similar to last year, the stock market failed the "first five days test" (thought of as a harbinger for the year's performance) and is also headed for a negative month, though neither of those omens proved accurate in 2014.

Not every year’s rally is brought up short by calendar rebalancing, but the current market is missing some of the high-octane fuel that keeps markets going around the annual turns.

Valuations aren’t cheap, despite the perennial equity fund manager protestation that they’re “reasonable.” The S&P 500 price/earning multiple is 19.7, a good four percentage points over its historical average.

Most of all, the fall of 2014 lacked the spark of boundless optimism that new programs of quantitative easing, or QE, have set off in previous years. The Fed ended its bond-buying stimulus effort in October. Nor did it have another surprise about-face on QE from the Fed, like the one in September 2013 that launched the market back on its way to half of that year’s gains.

In fact, this January lacked any momentum at all, as even the perennial Santa Claus rally faded at the finish and left the S&P 500 with a rare (though minimal) December decline. Small wonder that smaller gains could still lead to rebalancing and help fuel modest losses at the outset of the year.

Other factors are at work, of course, not least of which is the confidence- damaging plunge in oil prices. Lower energy costs are generally an economic good, but like a falling currency the benefits can take time to work their way into the economy.

The current 45-degree plunge, another example of a one-way trade run amuck, has had its initial effects by fanning fears about fading economic growth and failed bond principal payments. Waves of job and budget cuts in the energy sector are following, such as the Schlumberger (SLB) decision last week to ax 9,000 workers. The energy sector and energy-related activity has been one of the few sources of decent new jobs in the current U.S. recovery, particularly in manufacturing.

The supply-demand picture in oil isn’t as out of balance as the recent momentum would have it. Nor was it in 2008, when surging prices hit $150 a barrel. At that time every story of a refinery fire or unplanned shutdown - both common occurrences in a dirty, dangerous industry – immediately set prices on another spike higher. Now every story of increased supply or pause in demand, welcome a year ago, is another fright for traders.

Put the release of December retail sales– a big decline with a miss of consensus – into this volatile environment. Thus you have an easy-to-understand story about anxiety selling, even if the logic is a bit confused. The month’s sales were much better than the headline number would have you think. The year-on-year comparison for December unadjusted sales figures showed growth of 4.6%, above the average for the last 22 years (4.2%), while November-December combined showed year-on-year growth of 3.8% in unadjusted sales dollars, compared to 3.4% growth in 2013.

Certainly the fourth-quarter earnings season isn’t helping much. The current “blended” earnings rate for the quarter, according to FactSet, is a very meager 0.6%. The blended rate, a mix of estimated and actual results, is at this early stage almost entirely based on estimates. Earnings aren’t really expected to be quite that low, of course, as the necessary “positive surprise” factor requires a cushion of three to four percentage points.

But it’s the lowest expectation since the results for last year's weather-scarred first quarter, one not helped by the string of disappointing results from the big banks. Weak earnings growth isn’t a wonderful foundation for rising stock prices.

It’s a good time for caution. I don’t think the equity bull has been killed quite yet, though these things are admittedly difficult to discern in real time, and the stock market and the business cycles aren’t getting old, they are old. Such creatures may not die of pure old age, but they certainly don’t get new life from it either.

Yet bear markets almost never take hold in the spring, and a couple of benign central bank meetings could be all that it takes to have the S&P at 2100 and people talking about Fortress America again.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

M. Kevin Flynn, CFA, is the president of Avalon Asset Management Company in Lexington, Mass. Website: avalonassetmgmt.com.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

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The stock market has had bumpy start this year. Surprised? It mirrors January 2014. Lack of central bank stimulus, oil’s price decline and a few tepid reports are to blame this time.

Still, things worked out OK last year and may well this year. At Friday’s close, the Standard & Poor’s 500’s total return (price plus dividends) was down 0.26% for the month, although it has climbed back from the much-deeper mid-month low.

The early-2014 market suffered a sudden drop that puzzled investors spoiled by the easy, Federal Reserve-fueled returns of 2013. The prior year’s disproportionate gains led to quite a bout of portfolio rebalancing as institutions reduced equity exposure that previously rising stock prices drove into the red zones.

While 2014 wasn’t quite half as good as 2013, it was nonetheless enough to set off another wave of portfolio rebalancing. Mix in some legitimate fears about slowing economic growth with angst over falling prices, and there’s fright about what the coming year will bring. Similar to last year, the stock market failed the "first five days test" (thought of as a harbinger for the year's performance) and is also headed for a negative month, though neither of those omens proved accurate in 2014.

Not every year’s rally is brought up short by calendar rebalancing, but the current market is missing some of the high-octane fuel that keeps markets going around the annual turns.

Valuations aren’t cheap, despite the perennial equity fund manager protestation that they’re “reasonable.” The S&P 500 price/earning multiple is 19.7, a good four percentage points over its historical average.

Most of all, the fall of 2014 lacked the spark of boundless optimism that new programs of quantitative easing, or QE, have set off in previous years. The Fed ended its bond-buying stimulus effort in October. Nor did it have another surprise about-face on QE from the Fed, like the one in September 2013 that launched the market back on its way to half of that year’s gains.

In fact, this January lacked any momentum at all, as even the perennial Santa Claus rally faded at the finish and left the S&P 500 with a rare (though minimal) December decline. Small wonder that smaller gains could still lead to rebalancing and help fuel modest losses at the outset of the year.

Other factors are at work, of course, not least of which is the confidence- damaging plunge in oil prices. Lower energy costs are generally an economic good, but like a falling currency the benefits can take time to work their way into the economy.

The current 45-degree plunge, another example of a one-way trade run amuck, has had its initial effects by fanning fears about fading economic growth and failed bond principal payments. Waves of job and budget cuts in the energy sector are following, such as the Schlumberger (SLB) decision last week to ax 9,000 workers. The energy sector and energy-related activity has been one of the few sources of decent new jobs in the current U.S. recovery, particularly in manufacturing.

The supply-demand picture in oil isn’t as out of balance as the recent momentum would have it. Nor was it in 2008, when surging prices hit $150 a barrel. At that time every story of a refinery fire or unplanned shutdown - both common occurrences in a dirty, dangerous industry – immediately set prices on another spike higher. Now every story of increased supply or pause in demand, welcome a year ago, is another fright for traders.

Put the release of December retail sales– a big decline with a miss of consensus – into this volatile environment. Thus you have an easy-to-understand story about anxiety selling, even if the logic is a bit confused. The month’s sales were much better than the headline number would have you think. The year-on-year comparison for December unadjusted sales figures showed growth of 4.6%, above the average for the last 22 years (4.2%), while November-December combined showed year-on-year growth of 3.8% in unadjusted sales dollars, compared to 3.4% growth in 2013.

Certainly the fourth-quarter earnings season isn’t helping much. The current “blended” earnings rate for the quarter, according to FactSet, is a very meager 0.6%. The blended rate, a mix of estimated and actual results, is at this early stage almost entirely based on estimates. Earnings aren’t really expected to be quite that low, of course, as the necessary “positive surprise” factor requires a cushion of three to four percentage points.

But it’s the lowest expectation since the results for last year's weather-scarred first quarter, one not helped by the string of disappointing results from the big banks. Weak earnings growth isn’t a wonderful foundation for rising stock prices.

It’s a good time for caution. I don’t think the equity bull has been killed quite yet, though these things are admittedly difficult to discern in real time, and the stock market and the business cycles aren’t getting old, they are old. Such creatures may not die of pure old age, but they certainly don’t get new life from it either.

Yet bear markets almost never take hold in the spring, and a couple of benign central bank meetings could be all that it takes to have the S&P at 2100 and people talking about Fortress America again.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

M. Kevin Flynn, CFA, is the president of Avalon Asset Management Company in Lexington, Mass. Website: avalonassetmgmt.com.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

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Picking Benchmarks Wisely http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/picking-benchmarks-wisely/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/picking-benchmarks-wisely/#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 19:30:36 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?guid=f6fbc5886865145ecd276d6c1a72ab50 Maybe your family just wrapped up its holiday tradition of big gatherings where grandma headed the fireside sing-along or everyone got a year’s wisdom from your goofy brother-in-law. Maybe too you seethed silently at how well one relative is doing financially. As the holidays fade, we all must recognize our unrelenting desire to compare ourselves to loved ones – a path to both bad moods and potentially bad money moves.

In Predictably Irrational, author Dan Ariely writes, “Humans rarely choose things in absolute terms. We don’t have an internal value meter that tells us how much things are worth. Rather, we focus on the relative advantage of one thing over another, and estimate value accordingly.”

He adds, “We not only tend to compare things with one another but also tend to focus on comparing things that are easily comparable – and avoid comparing things that cannot be compared easily.” In other words, we often use completely irrelevant benchmarks to gauge our success and make decisions.

We compare our car or clothes with our siblings’. We compare how our children act relative to the neighbors’ kids. We decide how much to spend on our holiday shopping after we figure out how much our friends or family members plan to spend on theirs.

None of these comparisons makes rational sense. But we still find it far easier to take a shortcut and pursue easy comparisons that provide a simple, concrete (but irrelevant) answer. The question of how things best fit into our own lives seems far more abstract.

Every now and then a client of mine will lament refinancing a mortgage at 4% after his or her brother got 3.75%. The interest rate provides a simple, easy-to-understand comparison but misses the big picture. Digging deeper, we find that the benchmark brother paid closing costs and my client didn’t.

In 10 years, the monthly savings of that 0.25 percentage point difference will finally cover the closing costs. Suppose my client only wants to stay in the home for five? The brother’s rate is lower but ends up costing more eventually.

Nowhere is benchmarking more prevalent and more irrelevant than in investing. How your portfolio performs against the Standard & Poor’s 500, for instance, has no bearing on your financial well-being.

Some of you likely beat the S&P 500 in 2008 – and you didn’t jump for joy. Earning returns that are merely better than minus 37% (what the S&P lost that year) hardly gives you reason to celebrate. Also, if diversified, your portfolio almost certainly lagged the S&P 500 in 2014.

On this two-way street, you can’t expect to match the S&P 500 in good years or bad. Ignore the index, or at least take it with a degree of skepticism.

Your portfolio ought to be designed to provide you with the lifestyle you want. In most cases, such a plan does not mean a blind effort to maximize returns. Comparing your holdings to an arbitrary benchmark, especially over short periods, tells you nothing about whether your money will allow you to achieve your life goals.

Take an example from recent history: Your holiday budget needs to reflect your own money limit, not that of your relatives who try to accomplish different goals than you do in both life and spending.

For instance, in one recent holiday season, my wife and I did not exchange gifts. We had just moved into and furnished a new home and we spent Christmas in the hospital after delivering our second child. This year, we planned to spend more on gifts for our 3-year-old son than our 1-year-old daughter – not because we love him more but because his younger sister’s needs and wants are different and less expensive than his. We felt no need to force spending for the sake of equality between our two children.

The turn of the year provides time for reflection on the past 12 months and an opportunity to look forward. Take comfort in the certainty surrounding your family traditions but also set a goal to ignore irrelevant comparisons in your day-to-day life.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq

Joe Pitzl, CFP, is the managing partner at Pitzl Financial in Arden Hills, Minn. He writes for the blogs Beyond the Money and Financial Fairway. Follow Joe on Twitter at @joepitzl.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

]]>
Maybe your family just wrapped up its holiday tradition of big gatherings where grandma headed the fireside sing-along or everyone got a year’s wisdom from your goofy brother-in-law. Maybe too you seethed silently at how well one relative is doing financially. As the holidays fade, we all must recognize our unrelenting desire to compare ourselves to loved ones – a path to both bad moods and potentially bad money moves.

In Predictably Irrational, author Dan Ariely writes, “Humans rarely choose things in absolute terms. We don’t have an internal value meter that tells us how much things are worth. Rather, we focus on the relative advantage of one thing over another, and estimate value accordingly.”

He adds, “We not only tend to compare things with one another but also tend to focus on comparing things that are easily comparable – and avoid comparing things that cannot be compared easily.” In other words, we often use completely irrelevant benchmarks to gauge our success and make decisions.

We compare our car or clothes with our siblings’. We compare how our children act relative to the neighbors’ kids. We decide how much to spend on our holiday shopping after we figure out how much our friends or family members plan to spend on theirs.

None of these comparisons makes rational sense. But we still find it far easier to take a shortcut and pursue easy comparisons that provide a simple, concrete (but irrelevant) answer. The question of how things best fit into our own lives seems far more abstract.

Every now and then a client of mine will lament refinancing a mortgage at 4% after his or her brother got 3.75%. The interest rate provides a simple, easy-to-understand comparison but misses the big picture. Digging deeper, we find that the benchmark brother paid closing costs and my client didn’t.

In 10 years, the monthly savings of that 0.25 percentage point difference will finally cover the closing costs. Suppose my client only wants to stay in the home for five? The brother’s rate is lower but ends up costing more eventually.

Nowhere is benchmarking more prevalent and more irrelevant than in investing. How your portfolio performs against the Standard & Poor’s 500, for instance, has no bearing on your financial well-being.

Some of you likely beat the S&P 500 in 2008 – and you didn’t jump for joy. Earning returns that are merely better than minus 37% (what the S&P lost that year) hardly gives you reason to celebrate. Also, if diversified, your portfolio almost certainly lagged the S&P 500 in 2014.

On this two-way street, you can’t expect to match the S&P 500 in good years or bad. Ignore the index, or at least take it with a degree of skepticism.

Your portfolio ought to be designed to provide you with the lifestyle you want. In most cases, such a plan does not mean a blind effort to maximize returns. Comparing your holdings to an arbitrary benchmark, especially over short periods, tells you nothing about whether your money will allow you to achieve your life goals.

Take an example from recent history: Your holiday budget needs to reflect your own money limit, not that of your relatives who try to accomplish different goals than you do in both life and spending.

For instance, in one recent holiday season, my wife and I did not exchange gifts. We had just moved into and furnished a new home and we spent Christmas in the hospital after delivering our second child. This year, we planned to spend more on gifts for our 3-year-old son than our 1-year-old daughter – not because we love him more but because his younger sister’s needs and wants are different and less expensive than his. We felt no need to force spending for the sake of equality between our two children.

The turn of the year provides time for reflection on the past 12 months and an opportunity to look forward. Take comfort in the certainty surrounding your family traditions but also set a goal to ignore irrelevant comparisons in your day-to-day life.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq

Joe Pitzl, CFP, is the managing partner at Pitzl Financial in Arden Hills, Minn. He writes for the blogs Beyond the Money and Financial Fairway. Follow Joe on Twitter at @joepitzl.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

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Judy M. Thurk, 72 http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/judy-m-thurk-72/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/judy-m-thurk-72/#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 19:06:08 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=50074 Judy   M.  Thurk, 72

Judy M. Thurk, age 72, of Eden Prairie, passed away Sunday, Jan. 18, 2015 at her home in Eden Prairie.
Mass of Christian Burial Saturday, Jan. 31, 2015 at 11 a.m. at Pax Christi Catholic Community in Eden Prairie with Father William Murtaugh as Celebrant of the Mass; visitation Saturday from 9 a.m. until the time of the Mass at the church; interment St. Boniface Catholic Cemetery in St. Bonifacius.
Judy was born on June 9, 1942 in Minneapolis, Minn., the daughter of Steve and Tillie (Urista) Varian. On Aug. 22, 1967, Judy was married to Robert W. Thurk at St. Boniface Catholic Church in St. Bonifacius.
Judy worked as a Route Programmer for the Eden Prairie School District, belonged to the Eden Prairie Lioness Club, and taught religious classes at Pax Christi. She loved to laugh, sing, and spend time with her friends and family – especially her four grandchildren. She also enjoyed flowers, reading, and traveling to such places as China, England, France, Germany, Hawaii, Ireland, Russia, Spain, and Taiwan.
Judy is preceded in death her parents Steve and Tillie Varian; sister Linda Varian; father-in-law Wilbur Thurk; brother-in-law Will “Punky” Thurk.
Judy is survived by her loving family; husband Bob Thurk of Eden Prairie; sons Dave Thurk of Wayzata, Paul (Catherine) Thurk of Dublin, Ireland, Jeff (Angie) Thurk of South Bend, Ind; grandchildren Jack Thurk, Michael Thurk, Ashley Thurk, William Thurk; mother-in-law Agnes Thurk of St. Bonifacius; brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law Jerry Thurk of St. Bonifacius, Steve Thurk of St. Bonifacius, Teresa (Allan) Feltmann of Wahkon, Barbara (Michael) Smith of St. Bonifacius; nieces, nephews other relativs and friends.
Casket Bearers are Jerry Thurk, Steve Thurk, Al Feltmann, Mike Smith, Ann Langer, Julie Hetland.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the American Heart Association or St. Joseph’s Home for Children.
Arrangements with the Johnson Funeral Home in Waconia; www.johnsonfh.com.

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Dale E. Beightol, 78 http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/dale-e-beightol-78/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/dale-e-beightol-78/#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 19:05:59 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=50071 Dale   E.  Beightol, 78

Dale E. Beightol, age 78, of Watertown, passed away on Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015 at his home in Watertown.
Funeral Service held on Monday, Jan. 26, 2015 at 11 a.m. at Lyndale Lutheran Church (8012 CR 6) Maple Plain with Rev. Gale Reitan officiating; visitation from 10 a.m. until the time of service at church; interment Watertown Public Cemetery.
Dale was born on Aug. 17, 1936 to Ford F. and Stella (Erstad) Beightol. On Aug. 4, 1972 Dale was united in marriage to Betty Metcalf at the Little Brown Church in Nashua, Iowa.
Dale was preceded in death by his wife Betty; parents Ford and Stella Beightol; brothers Gene and Glen Beightol.
Dale was an avid outdoors man enjoying deer hunting, fishing and camping. He could build almost anything which included several houses and the nicest furniture. Dale was an old car enthusiast, he enjoyed seeing and buying cars of that vintage. He went to clown school with his wife Betty, the two of them liked to go out and entertain people. Dale was an active member of Lyndale Lutheran Church in Maple Plain.
Dale is survived by his loving family; children Timothy (Kirsten) Schoonover of Isanti, LaNae Beightol of Watertown, Jeff Schoonover of St. Peter, Joni Beightol of Webster City, Iowa, Dale Beightol Jr. of Iowa, Kelly Beightol of Fort Dodge, Iowa; 14 grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren heavy on the great; sister Joan (Bob) Day of Apple Valley; brother Neil (Gail) Beightol of Parkers Prairie; sisters-in-law and brothers-in-law Mary Lou and Ron Anderson of Coon Rapids, Dorothy and Ron Westrum of Elk River, Don and Joyce Metcalf of Stacy; nieces, nephews other relatives and friends.
Casket Bearers Don Metcalf, Tim Schoonover, Gene Beightol Jr. Brian Manke, Robin Beightol, Neil Beightol.
Honorary Casket Bearers Ron Westrum, Ron Anderson, Roger Nelson, Don Schumacher.
Arrangements are with the Johnson Funeral Home in Waconia; www.johnsonfh.com.

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Gerhard F. Marquardt, 92 http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/gerhard-f-marquardt-92/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/gerhard-f-marquardt-92/#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 19:05:53 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=50068 Gerhard   F.  Marquardt, 92

Gerhard F. Marquardt, age 92, of Waconia, passed away Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015 at Emerald Crest in Victoria.
Funeral Service Monday, Jan. 26, 2015 at 1 p.m. Trinity Lutheran Church (601 2nd St. East), Waconia with Rev. Robert Alsleben officiating; visitation one hour prior to the service at the church; interment Trinity Lutheran Cemetery, Waconia.
Gerhard F. Marquardt was born on Oct. 2, 1922 in Posen Township, Minn., the son of Carl and Alvina (Hulke) Marquardt. He was baptized on Oct. 22, 1922 at St. Lukes Evangelical Lutheran Church in Posen Township by Rev. Brauer and later confirmed in the Christian Faith on May 17, 1936 at St. Lukes Evangelical Lutheran Church in Posen Township by Rev. WH Baumann. On Sept. 22, 1946, Gerhard was united in marriage to Bernice V. Slettedahl in Woodlake, Minn.
Gerhard was a proud veteran of WWII, serving his country in the U.S. Army from Nov. 17, 1944 until his honorable discharge on Aug. 26, 1946. Gerhard was a hard worker and in his early days was a farm hand. He spent most of his career as a mechanic until his retirement.
Gerhard enjoyed raising pheasants, chickens, and gold fish. You could often find him doing yard work and working in his gardens. He would tend to his apple and plum trees, grapes and tomatoes and would can all the vegetables that he grew. Gerhard liked to drive around town and visit with his family and friends and loved building his grandchildren all sorts of toys.
Gerhard was a faithful member of Trinity Lutheran Church in Waconia, serving his time as an AAL Volunteer, church steward, usher, and counting money for weekly church donations.
Gerhard is preceded in death by his parents Carl and Alvina Marquardt; brothers Harold, Oscar, Carl Jr., and Lawrence Marquardt; sister Bertina Schramm.
Gerhard is survived by his loving family: wife Bernice; daughters Patricia (Richard) Wrase of Chanhassen, Dorothy (Ron) Roth of Waconia, Debra Marquardt-Landin (Kim Landin) of Waconia; grandchildren Michael (Ania) Wrase, Michelle Wrase, Jason Roth, Jeffrey Roth, Adam Landin, Matthew Landin; great granddaughter Katrina Wrase; sister Bernice Lieske of Arlington; sisters-in-law Esther Marquardt of Eden Prairie, Deloris Marquardt of Gibbon, Mabel Slettedahl of Cottonwood, Arfield Kvendru of Belevue; nieces, nephew other relatives and friends.
Casket Bearers are Michael Wrase, Michelle Wrase, Jason Roth, Jeffrey Roth, Adam Landin, Matthew Landin, Chris Marquardt.
Honorary Casket Bearers are Ania Wrase and Katrina Wrase.
Arrangements with the Johnson Funeral Home in Waconia; www.johnsonfh.com.

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Beverly A. Zellmann, 77 http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/beverly-a-zellmann-77/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/beverly-a-zellmann-77/#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 19:05:45 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=50065 Beverly   A.  Zellmann, 77

Beverly A. Zellmann, age 77, of Plato, passed away Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 at the Glencoe Regional Health Services Long Term Care.
Memorial Service 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015 at St. John’s Lutheran Church (216 McLeod Avenue North) in Plato with Rev. Tyson Mastin as officiant. Gathering of family and friends Sunday from 12:30 p.m. until the time of the service at the church.
Beverly Ann (Schmakel) Zellmann was born on April 11, 1937 in Waconia the daughter of Albert and Helen (Luebke) Schmakel. She was baptized and confirmed at the Trinity Lutheran Church in Waconia. Beverly was a graduate of the Waconia High School. On Nov. 30, 1957 Beverly was united in marriage with Earl F. Zellmann at Trinity Lutheran Church in Waconia.
After Earl’s discharge from the military, the couple moved to Plato. Beverly has been a devoted member of the St. John’s Lutheran Church in Plato and has volunteered whenever needed. She enjoyed watching and studying birds, camping, fishing, quilting and scrapbooking. Beverly began every morning with the crossword from the daily paper. She loved to play dice games and cards, especially Sheephead and Rummy 500. She was crazy about sports and enjoyed the Twins, Timberwolves, Wild, Vikings, Gophers and the local high school teams. Beverly kept track of and reported on all of the activity of Plato which she gathered from the post office and her kitchen window.
Beverly’s life was focused on her family. She would cut out all the articles or highlights of her kids and grandchildren and cherished every visit and phone call.
Beverly is preceded in death by her parents Albert and Helen Schmakel; sisters and brother-in-law Elvira and Fred Henry, Shirley Lewis; brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law Raymond and Martha Zellmann, Rosella and Walter Neumann, Luella and Elvin Mueller, Lucille and Maynard Haag, Robert Kuchenmeister.
Beverly is survived by her loving family: husband Earl Zellmann of Plato; children Grant (Rachelle) Zellmann of Norwood Young America, Nate (Amy) Zellmann of Arlington; grandchildren Jenna Zellmann and Allison Zellmann; sister-in-law Bernice Kuchenmeister of Chaska; nieces, nephews, other relatives and many dear friends.
Arrangements with the Johnson Funeral Home in Waconia; www.johnsonfh.com.

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Eleanor D. Notermann, 84 http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/eleanor-d-notermann-84/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/eleanor-d-notermann-84/#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 19:05:34 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=50062 Eleanor D. Notermann, age 84, of Waconia, passed away Wednesday, Jan. 21, 2015 at Auburn Home in Waconia.
Mass of Christian Burial Saturday, Jan. 24, 2015 at 11 a.m. at St. Victoria Catholic Church (8228 Victoria Dr.), Victoria with Father Bob White as Celebrant of the Mass; visitation from 9:30 a.m. until the time of the Mass at the church; interment church cemetery.
Eleanor D. Notermann was born on Aug. 26, 1930 in Chaska Township, Minn., the daughter of Phillip and Helen (Gestach) Schindler. She was baptized and confirmed at Guardian Angels Catholic Church in Chaska. On Sept. 25, 1951, Eleanor was united in marriage to Robert Notermann at Guardian Angels Catholic Church in Chaska, Minn. Robert passed away on May 25, 1983. Eleanor married Ben Maiser in 1994.
Eleanor enjoyed gardening, mowing the lawn, dancing, and singing. She especially loved spending time with her grandchildren.
Eleanor is preceded in death by her husband Robert Notermann; husband Ben Maiser; parents Phillip and Helen Schindler; sisters Florence Peters and Carolyn Stacken.
Eleanor is survived by her loving family; daughters Jan (Rich) Schulz of Brooklyn Park, Jean Kamrath of Waconia, Deb (Jim) Norton of Inver Grove Heights, Kris Notermann of Eden Prairie; son Dan (Rhonda) Notermann of Chaska; grandchildren Jennifer Schulz (Paul Weier), Jon (Kate) Schulz, Tim (Rachel) Schulz, Jason (Becky) Kamrath, Jessica Goenner, Bob (Emily) Norton, Nick Norton, Ken VanEyll, Brad VanEyll (fiance;e Chelsey Rossell), Haley Notermann; great-grandchildren Taylan Kamrath, Jaycee Kamrath, Henry Schulz, Dane Goenner, Abby Norton; sister Phyllis (Wally) Robling of Chaska; brother Chub (Judy) Schindler of Arizona; brother-in-law Paul Stacken of Chaska; sisters-in-law Evelyn Notermann of Waconia, Lillian Notermann of Shakopee; nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends.
Casket Bearers are Eleanor’s grandsons.
Arrangements with the Johnson Funeral Home, Waconia; (952) 442-2121; www.johnsonfh.com.

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Peggy L. Caviness, 61 http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/peggy-l-caviness-61/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/peggy-l-caviness-61/#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 19:05:22 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=50059 Peggy   L.  Caviness, 61

Peggy L. Caviness, age 61, of Waconia, passed away Monday, Jan. 19, 2015 at the Park Nicollet Methodist Hospital in St. Louis Park.
Funeral Service Friday, Jan. 23, 2015 at 2 p.m. at the Freshwater Community Church (4319 Steiner Street) in St. Bonifacius with Rev. John Van Tassel as officiant. Visitation Friday from 12:30 p.m. until the time of the service at the church. Interment 10:35 a.m. Monday at Fort Snelling National Cemetery (Assembly area #6) in Minneapolis.
Peggy Lee (Larson) Caviness was born Sept. 15, 1953 in Slayton the daughter of Donald and Ina Mae (Dayton) Larson. She was baptized at the Lake Sarah Baptist Church in Slayton. Peggy graduated from the Tracy High School and attended Alexandria Technical College. On June 22, 1974 Peggy was united in marriage with Richard W. Caviness at the Lake Sarah Baptist Church.
Peggy had worked in administration for a law office in Windom until 1986 when the family moved to Waconia. Peggy had worked in administration for Three Rivers Park District and for the past eight years for Scott County. Peggy was an active member of the Freshwater Community Church in St. Bonifacius. She had a love for volunteering and had participated on a number of mission trips to Haiti. Peggy also enjoyed gardening, flowers, reading and traveling to locations including Ireland, London, Washington D.C. and Florida.
Peggy spent countless hours with her seven grandchildren having sleepovers, teaching them to bake and taking field trips everywhere. They brought unending joy to her life. Peggy will be incredibly missed by her family. She will always be remembered for her desire to help everyone she knew, always putting others first.
Peggy is preceded in death by her mother Ina Mae Larson; brother Paul Larson; brothers-in-law Art Freer, Darrell Caviness; sister-in-law Faye Caviness.
Peggy is survived by her loving family: husband Richard Caviness of Waconia; children Holly (Jason) Mooney of Burnsville, Jeff (Heidi) Caviness of Watertown, Alaina (Rod) Sanford of Plymouth; grandchildren Eva, Liam and Johanna Mooney, Parker and Landon Caviness, Rodney and Ruby Sanford; father Donald Larson of Slayton; sisters Lynn (Ralph) Haberman of Norwood Young America, Sandy (Mike) Keller of Burnsville, Connie (Bill) Vihovde of Burnsville; brother Doug Larson of Sioux Falls, SD; sisters-in-law and brothers-in-law Evie Freer of Council Bluffs, Iowa, Joyce and Darrell Nissen of Lakefield, Harold and JoAnn Caviness of Windom; nieces, nephews, other relatives and many dear friends.
Serving as casket bearers Jason Mooney, Rod Sanford, Bill Vihovde, Doug Larson, Mike Keller, Darrell Nissen.
Arrangements with the Johnson Funeral Home in Waconia; www.johnsonfh.com.

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LeIsle E. Plocher, 88 http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/leisle-e-plocher-88/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/leisle-e-plocher-88/#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 19:05:12 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=50056 LeIsle   E.  Plocher, 88

LeIsle E. Plocher, age 88, of Waconia, passed away Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 at Auburn Meadows in Waconia.
Funeral Service Saturday, Jan. 24, 2015 at 11 a.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church (601 East 2nd St.), Waconia with Rev. Anders Davidson officiating; visitation one hour prior to the service at the church; interment Trinity Lutheran Cemetery, Waconia.
LeIsle E. Plocher was born on March 3, 1926 in Watertown, Minn., the daughter of Henry and Edna (Oestreich) Domres. She was baptized and confirmed at Zion Lutheran Church in Mayer. On Oct. 11, 1946, LeIsle was united in marriage to Winfried Rolf in South Dakota, he passed away July 3, 1988. In September 1990, LeIsle was united in Marriage to Dahle “Buddy” Plocher at Trinity Lutheran Church in Waconia.
LeIsle was a hard worker and enjoyed farm life. She cleaned houses for many years, she also did waitressing and worked at Nightingale Nursing Home and retired shortly after.
LeIsle loved getting together with family and friend and enjoyed a good visit. She helped Dahle with the gardening and canning of tomatoes. She enjoyed playing cards, putting together puzzles, shaking dice with her friends, music, dancing and playing the organ and piano that she learned by ear. She loved to go gambling at the casino and McDonald’s for coffee and lunch.
LeIsle was a faithful member of Trinity Lutheran in Waconia, serving on the Trinity Lutheran Church LWML and belonged to the Waconia American Legion Auxiliary.
LeIsle is preceded in death by her husbands Winfried Rolf and Dahle “Buddy” Plocher; brother and sister-in-law Donald and Gladys Domres; brother-in-law Howard Menth.
LeIsle is survived by her loving family: daughters and sons-in-law Natalie and Roger Sauter of Cologne, Emily and Bill McFarland of Outing; grandchildren Tim (Amy) Sauter, Kelly (Vickie Anderson) Sauter, Matthew McFarland; great grandchildren Rebecca Sauter, Cole Sauter, Janelle Sauter, Clayton Sauter; great great granddaughter Sophie Jewitt; step children Ken (Diane) Plocher of Waconia, Larry (Jackie) Plocher of Waconia, Joanne Heacock and fiance; Ron “Mort” Worm of Norwood Young America; step grandchildren Shawn Plocher, Jill (Jon) Schmidt, Julie (Chris) Johnson, Mark Plocher, Brett (Stacy) Plocher, Scott Plocher, Amber Heacock, Dahle Heacock, Taryn (Jim) Brown, Tristi (Najib) Mechlaoui; step great-grandchildren Jessica, Trevor, Kate, Lauren, Matthew, Keelan, Lucas, Kaley, Vangy, Malak, Ryanne, Adam; sister Vernice Menth of Michigan; brother-in-law Eugene Willems of Norwood Young America; nieces, nephews other relatives and friends.
Casket Bearers are Tim Sauter, Kelly Sauter, Matthew McFarland, Rebecca Sauter, Cole Sauter, Janelle Sauter, Clayton Sauter.
Arrangement with the Johnson Funeral Home in Waconia; www.johnsonfh.com.

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Beverly A. Miller, 85 http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/beverly-a-miller-85/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/01/26/beverly-a-miller-85/#comments Mon, 26 Jan 2015 19:04:30 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=50053 Beverly   A.   Miller, 85

Beverly A. Miller, age 85, of Waconia passed away on Friday January 23, 2015 at the Good Samaritan Center in Waconia.
Mass of Christian Burial Thursday Jan. 29, 2015 at 10:30 a.m. at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Waconia with Father Bennet Tran as celebrant of the Mass; visitation from 9 a.m. until the time of Mass at the church; interment St. Joseph’s Catholic Cemetery, Waconia.
Beverly was born on November 12, 1929 in Fairmount, New York the daughter of Earl and Lois (Manwarren) Ross. After High School graduation Beverly was employed by Singer Publishing Corporation for several years. Beverly met her future husband Eugene, while she and one of her girlfriends were on vacation on the island of Bermuda. Eugene, who was in the Air Force was stationed at the Air base, located on the island. On December 29, 1952 Beverly and Eugene were married at the Base Chapel on Kindley Air Force Base St. George, Bermuda.
In 1958 Beverly and her family returned to Minnesota to begin civilian life after Eugene’s discharge from the Air Force. The family lived in Glencoe from 1958 to 1964. In 1964 Beverly and her husband Eugene, who worked for the local telephone company transferred to the general office, so the family moved to Waconia where they currently reside. Beverly lived for her family, faith, and friends. Besides being a homemaker Beverly was very active in the community and at St. Joseph’s parish life. Of all the activities Beverly was involved in she truly loved quilting. She designed and made many quilts over the years. Beverly also worked for several years at Rolling Acres Home for the handicapped and as a Senior Citizens director for the Watertown and Carver Senior Citizens center. Beverly will be dearly missed by her family and her many friends.
Beverly was preceded in death by her parents Earl and Lois (Manwarren) Ross; grandparents Emmet and Mabel Ross, Frank and Erma Manwarren; brothers Earl Jr. “Red”, John and Bill Ross.
Beverly is survived by her loving family husband Eugene; sons and daughters-in-law Gene Jr. and Ann Miller or Owatonna, Dick and Kim Miller of Buffalo, Gary and Jennifer Miller of Flower Mound, Texas; grandchildren Angella and Cory Graves, Jamie and Jeff Morness, Nicholas Miller, Zachary Miller, Jacob Miller and fiance;e Jenny Jiang, Jessica Miller, Evan Miller; great-grandchildren Hunter Deleon and Kaitlyn Deleon; sister Barbara Roehrig of Liverpool, New York, sisters-in-law and brothers-in-law Eunice Ross of Syracuse, New York, Donna Ross of Henderson, New York, Sandy Ross of Liverpool, New York, Roman and Alta Miller of Mora, Leo Miller of Atlanta, GA, Marian and Ron Stark of Mora, Larry Boggs of Mora, Bob and Sue Miller of Baltimore, MD, nieces, nephews other relatives and friends.
Casket Bearers Nicholas Miller, Zachary Miller, Jacob Miller, Steven Miller, Jeff Morness, Joey Dimler. Honorary Casket Bearers Jamie Morness, Jessica Miller, Evan Miller, Angela Dimler.
Arrangements are with the Johnson Funeral Home in Waconia. www.johnsonfh.com

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