Sun Patriot http://sunpatriot.com The Waconia Patriot, Carver County News and Norwood Young America Times Sun, 02 Aug 2015 14:00:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Pre-register for Stiftungsfest car, truck, tractor show http://sunpatriot.com/2015/08/02/pre-register-for-stiftungsfest-car-truck-tractor-show/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/08/02/pre-register-for-stiftungsfest-car-truck-tractor-show/#comments Sun, 02 Aug 2015 14:00:44 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=55132 Car Show car - CMYK
The 14th annual Stiftungsfest classic car, truck, tractor show and second annual cruise will be on Aug. 30. (Submitted photo)

Summer has arrived and that means car show season has started.
Organizers are looking forward to bringing you the 14th annual Stiftungsfest classic car, truck, tractor show and second annual cruise.
2014 brought us our first year of running this car show and we had approximately 70 participants. Organizers are hoping to exceed last year’s numbers.
So get those cars, trucks, and tractors shined up, call your friends, and come out to enjoy a great summer day and help support our local fire department.
All proceeds of Stiftungsfest go to the NYA Fire Department and are used to help fund equipment, gear, and other essential items needed to provide safety to our community.
We hope to see all you at the show and bring all your friends with.
The Stiftungsfest car show will again be held on Sunday, Aug. 30 on the east side of main street Young America.
Registration starts any time after 8 a.m. with the show starting at 9 a.m.  The cruise will leave at noon with awards following. To enter the show it will be $10 at the gate and $8 if you pre-register by Aug. 1.
All years and makes welcome.  Vehicles enter at intersection of Main St. SE and Third Ave. (Cty Rd. 34).
During the show we will have a D.J. playing all your favorite music.  We will also be having Amanda with www.aphotographer.me taking pictures for us again.
The car show is free to the public and afterwards hopefully you will go into the park and have yourself a famous Stiftungsfest hamburger or brat.
Entry into the park is $6 a person. For more information on the car show, please check us out on Facebook at Stiftungsfest Car Show and Cruise or on the web at http://stiftungsfestcarshow.weebly.com.  You can also find all the information about Stiftungsfest festival at www.stiftungsfest.org.
If you would like to volunteer to help with any part of the car show, please contact Justin Nelson at 952-693-6346. Not after 8:30 please.
Thank you again to all the donators last year including Sinclair (Smith Oil), Napa Auto Parts, Holiday, Carquest, Klein Bank, Good Time Liquor, Schmidt Chiropractic, Subway, Sports Cars, Sacred Health Family Chiropractic, Kwik Trip, McDonalds, True Value, DQ, Unhinged Pizza, Econo Foods, Thirsty’s Bar & Grill, Linds Hardware, Locher Bros, Ford, Super America, Mackenthuns, Domino’s, Papa Murphy’s, Parts City Auto Parts, HEI Collision, Muller Family Theatres, Hagerty Insurance, Summit Racing, Moroso, Wizards Products, and others.

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Council urges residents to take part in ‘Night’ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/08/02/council-urges-residents-to-take-part-in-night/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/08/02/council-urges-residents-to-take-part-in-night/#comments Sun, 02 Aug 2015 05:01:26 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=55158 By Lorrie Ham
Waconia Patriot

National Night Out (NNO) committee member Linda Froehling was on hand for the July 15 St. Boni City Council meeting seeking the council’s support for the upcoming NNO event. Froehling also invited the community to join their neighbors in celebrating the 32nd anniversary of National Night Out on August 4 at City Park from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
A free dinner will be served, courtesy of local businesses and community organizations, while supplies last. McGruff the Crime Dog, the Minnetrista Department of Public Safety and the St. Boni Fire Department will provide great information on safety, crime and drug prevention, said Froehling. Door prizes will include gas coupons and gift cards. Kids’ games and prizes will also be part of the fun. After serving 350 people at last year’s event, Froehling said the committee is planning for more than 400 to attend this year.
Mayor Rick Weible encouraged the community to participate in this “great” event.
In another matter, the council accepted the Geotechnical Exploration Report from Haugo GeoTechnical Services for the soil borings conducted at the site of the future Community Center parking lot. MnDOT, the Three Rivers Park District and the city are partnering on the project to provide parking for Dakota Trail users and visitors to city hall and the community room, as well as commuters via a Park and Ride lot. The lot will be located where the existing ball fields are on the south side of the Community Center and on the north side of Highway 7.
According to City Engineer Jake Saulsbury, the borings were necessary to determine how much excavation will be necessary for the project. “The results are consistent with the other boring we’ve conducted,” said Councilmember Bob Smestad. Mayor Weible agreed, saying it was “pretty much what we expected.” Saulsbury will present an updated cost estimate for the project at a future meeting.
The council also approved a conditional use permit (CUP) for Kyle McCabe to allow auto repair at 8750 Highway 7 (southeast corner of Highway 7 and County Road 92) in the Mixed Use Business Industrial District. Mayor Weible asked McCabe if he was agreeable to the conditions set in a public hearing prior to the regular meeting. McCabe agreed to keep outdoor storage of vehicles to be repaired on a paved surface with striped parking stalls; keep a maximum of two tow trucks outside, unless screened in the rear of the building, and no storage of unlicensed or junk vehicles.
Councilmembers welcomed McCabe to the community. Councilmember Mary Bishop said she was happy to have McCabe’s business coming to town, even though she voted against the CUP because she felt there should be more screening.
In another matter, Bishop invited members of the community to participate in an August 11 pot luck at the Community Center. Bishop said this was the first resident community activity planned for the Center, although others will be planned in the future. Set up will begin at 11:30 a.m. with the meal to follow at noon. Participants should bring a pot luck dish and their own eating utensils.

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Pioske plays on national championship team http://sunpatriot.com/2015/08/01/pioske-plays-on-national-championship-team/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/08/01/pioske-plays-on-national-championship-team/#comments Sat, 01 Aug 2015 20:17:47 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=55240 The Northern Lights 15-2s celebrate after winning the national championship. Danielle Pioske, Waconia sophomore, is pictured in the front row, third from the right. (Submitted photo)
The Northern Lights 15-2s celebrate after winning the national championship. Danielle Pioske, Waconia sophomore, is pictured in the front row, third from the right. (Submitted photo)

Waconia sophomore Danielle Pioske was part of an AAU volleyball team that went 81-14 and won a national championship.
“Dee is one of the hardest working and most driven kids I have ever met,” said coach Damien Fox. “Her on the court leadership is second to none and her desire to be great is top notch. I was incredibly fortunate to not only coach this team as it was the most unique team I have ever coached or played with, in any sport, but I feel very lucky to have had the opportunity to coach Dee. Waconia is incredibly lucky to have a kid like that in their program.”
Pioske was a member of the Northern Lights 15-2’s, a team of 10 players from around the metro area (Faribault, Waconia, Lakeville North, Minneapolis, St. Louis Park, East Ridge in Woodbury, Howard Lake, Rosemount and Eagan).
Pioske played as a defensive specialist and outside hitter.
The team won the January Thaw tournament in Minneapolis, the Omaha Presidents Day Classic, Northern Lights Qualifier in Minneapolis, National Junior Classic in Chicago, and an AAU National Championship in Orlando
The Northern Lights 15-2’s also placed second at the Show Me Qualifier in Kansas City and placed fifth at USAV National Championships in New Orleans.

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Local youth selected for Extreme Mustang Makeover http://sunpatriot.com/2015/08/01/local-youth-selected-for-extreme-mustang-makeover/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/08/01/local-youth-selected-for-extreme-mustang-makeover/#comments Sat, 01 Aug 2015 17:29:49 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=55222 Laura Ramacher of Watertown has been selected to compete in the Fort Worth Extreme Mustang Makeover held at the Will Rogers Equestrian Center in Fort Worth, TX September 10-12.

Laura Ramacher of Watertown and her horse Tigger will be at the Carver County Fair. (Photo submitted)
Laura Ramacher of Watertown and her horse Tigger will be at the Carver County Fair. (Photo submitted)

The youth will have approximately 100 days to gentle a randomly assigned wild horse they will pick up in May and compete for an estimated $25,000 in prize money. Laura Ramacher, 17, will be a senior at Watertown–Mayer High School for the 2015-16 academic year. She has been riding since she was five in a variety of disciplines such as show jumping, western pleasure and dressage. Laura is now training her American Quarter Horse, named Diego, for barrel racing. Through the techniques she has learned from a variety of disciplines, as well as knowledge from previous and current trainers, she has been training her two-year-old Mustang, Tigger. If you would like to personally meet Tigger, he will be at the Carver County Fair, August 5-9 in the horse barn. The Mustangs competing in the Extreme Mustang Makeover challenge, which were virtually untouched prior to the early May pick-up, will compete in Fort Worth in September. The youth, ages 8-17, and Mustangs will compete in a series of classes that will showcase their new skills. The horses will compete in handling and conditioning, leading trail and a freestyle class. Event information about the Fort Worth Extreme Mustang Makeover is available at http://extrememustangmakeover.com/extreme-mustang-makeover-fort-worth/. The purpose of the competition is to showcase the beauty, versatility, and trainability of these rugged horses that roam freely on public lands throughout the West, where they are protected by the BLM under federal law. The BLM periodically removes excess animals from the range to ensure herd health and protect rangeland resources. Thousands of the removed animals are then made available each year to the public for adoption. Nearly 5,500 wild horses have been adopted through Mustang Heritage Foundation events and programs since 2007. The Extreme Mustang Makeovers are made possible through our partnership with the Bureau of Land Management and the generosity of sponsors Western Horseman, Ram Rodeo, Vetericyn, Gist Silversmiths, Roper Apparel & Footwear, RIDE TV, Martin Saddlery and Classic Equine, the North American Mustang Association and Registry, and Smith Brothers.

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Old Fashioned Fun http://sunpatriot.com/2015/08/01/old-fashioned-fun/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/08/01/old-fashioned-fun/#comments Sat, 01 Aug 2015 14:00:09 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=55129 NT - Glad Days 091-CMYK
Cologne Glad Days packed in the fun during a three-day festival this past weekend. Top, performers from Old West Society of Minnesota entertain the crowd on Saturday. (NYA Times staff photo by Adam Gruenewald)
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Parley Lake Winery brings home gold from competition http://sunpatriot.com/2015/08/01/parley-lake-winery-brings-home-gold-from-competition-2/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/08/01/parley-lake-winery-brings-home-gold-from-competition-2/#comments Sat, 01 Aug 2015 05:01:14 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=55155 PATRIOT STAFF REPORTS

Parley Lake Winery received three gold medals and two bronze medals in the Ninth Annual Mid-American Wine Competition held at the Des Moines Area Community College campus in Ankeny, Iowa. Parley Lake’s Barn Quilt Red was also a finalist for best dry red wine.
“That was kind of nice. Barn Quilt is probably our most popular wine in the winery,” said Steve Zeller, wine maker and owner at Parley Lake Winery. “We also won a gold medal with our Marquette. That’s the sixth gold medal we’ve won with our Marquette wines in the last five years, so our Marquette is our most awarded wine.”
The competition was held July 10-12 and included wines from 12 Midwestern states. Professional wine judges from throughout the United States awarded 95 Gold medals, 167 Silver medals, and 167 Bronze medals.
“The quality of Midwestern wines continues to improve,” said Bob Foster, Director of the Mid-American Wine Competition. “These are high quality wines that wine lovers should seek out and try.”
Zeller agreed.
“I think what’s happening is the grapes the University of Minnesota has released in the last ten years … have really allowed wine makers in cold climates to really improve their wine-making skills,” Zeller said.
Zeller said collaboration has been crucial to Minnesota wineries in improving the quality of the cold-climate wines crafted here.
“We learn from each other, which I think is an important characteristic. I have a lot of wine-maker friends in Minnesota that we share discuss a lot of what we’re trying to do to improve the industry as a whole,” Zeller said.

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Sky’s the limit http://sunpatriot.com/2015/07/31/skys-the-limit/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/07/31/skys-the-limit/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 19:50:12 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=55217 The Veteran’s Program at the Carver County Fair not only found a former resident, but one with a captivating record and family history. scanner_20150715_135046

Chuck Sell of Mayer started his military career off early, joining the Army Air Corps when he was 18.
After training, Sell was a part of the effort started by President Truman to segregate the armed forces in 1948 after World War II.
Sell, one of four white people on a team led by then-Colonel Benjamin Davis, were charged with interviewing all the Tuskegee Airmen and helping integrate them into the Air Force.
One of the things Sell would often do is fly from base to base checking to see if people were properly assigned to their units.
A fair number of Tuskegee were put on KP duty (cooks and bakers) while others were assigned as truck drivers. Those who were unable to read were sent to literary school.
Sell said that the people who lived in the northern states didn’t know the extent of the segregation problems in the South, noting that despite his rank, Davis still had to sit in the back of the bus.
“We were not uncomfortable being around African Americans like some were,” Sell said.
Years later, when Sell would fly commercial flights, there were times when an African American would be the pilot, much to the chagrin of other passengers.
But by working with and interviewing the Tuskegee Airmen, Sell had a different way of looking at it.
“If that boy is on this airplane, he is a much better pilot than most,” Sell said.
He gave credit to President Truman for integration of African Americans into the Air Force
“Not to belittle (Martin Luther King, Jr.), but that took a lot of guts to integrate in ‘48,” Sell said.
He also credited Davis not only for striving to make his fellow African Americans “presentable” to the suburban whites who feared the change they represented, but also the strides the effort made for future civil rights actions.
Davis later became a four star general and the first black general in the Air Force.
“You can imagine for one year doing that the experiences you have, the people you meet,” Sell said.

From Mayer to St. Cloud
Sell grew up in Mayer, where his father Elmer owned and operated the first airport in Carver County.
It housed Great Lakes, a twin engine plane, and was also how Elmer and Chuck gave airplane rides to locals in the region.
“We probably gave everyone their first airplane ride,” Sell said.
Sell was married to Cathy (Anderson) Sell of Waconia for 70 years before she passed away.
Considering his work with segregation, Sell recalled the lack of diversity in mid-century Carver County.
“How many people around Mayer saw black people growing up?” Sell said. ‘How many people even went into the city?”
Sell recalled that people going into Minneapolis was so infrequent at the time, that when 30 students sang at KSTP and later ate at a restaurant, most of the students had never seen a menu before.
“Of the 30 students, there were 28 orders of sauerkraut and wieners,” he said.
After the Air Corps and Air Force segregation, Sell went to college at the University of Minnesota. He later worked at in the Lester Prairie School system for a handful of years before going to St. Cloud Tech, where we was a teacher, coach, assistant principal and later the principal of the middle school. He retired in 1983 after 32 years at St. Cloud, where he currently resides.
He also became the State Chairman for the AARP and was involved in the National Educators Association, where he said he met many “amazing” people.
“You would talk to them and have no idea who you were talking to,” Sell said. “It was tremendous.”
To hear more about Sell and his experiences, be sure to hear him speak at the ceremony on Aug. 1 at the Carver County Fair.
The veteran’s program will begin walking in the parade at 2 p.m. to the fairgrounds. The auxiliary and local boy scout troop have also been invited to participate. Golf carts will be available for veterans who have trouble walking, and rides back to vehicles will be given to veterans as well.
The program begins at 2:30 p.m. with NYA Legion Commander Dick Stolz as the emcee, followed by a speech by Sell.

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Retiring Boomers: Change http://sunpatriot.com/2015/07/31/retiring-boomers-change/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/07/31/retiring-boomers-change/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 19:33:37 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?guid=9fdc6e34d7a3a76249641316efc0c55a Are you one of the largest generation in American history? Comfortable with how much you have saved for retirement? Comfort is one thing, reality another, and boomers may be running of time to work on the financial quality of post-work life.

A recent study from the Insured Retirement Institute (IRI) surveyed 803 baby boomers ages 52 to 68 on expectations for retirement. I was shocked that the overall “economic satisfaction” for boomers dropped to a five-year low of 48%. I assume that the economic satisfaction they refer to equates to a financial comfort zone: enough savings and income for retirement.

Between 2011 and 2013, the satisfaction levels averaged 77% before falling to 65% in 2014. The numbers tanked 17 more percentage points this year, meaning that over half of America’s boomers are dissatisfied with their financial situation as they either prepare for or enter retirement.

Looking further, I found a glaring reason behind such gloom: As of this year, only five out of 10 boomer retirees surveyed have any savings, planning instead to rely completely on government benefits, pension income or both. About a third (34%) of respondents have $100,000 or more saved; only 19% maintain $250,000 or more saved for retirement.

According to my research for my book You Can Retire Sooner Than You Think, the tipping point for my happy retirees was $500,000 in liquid net worth (aka, retirement savings). Clearly, only a small fraction of boomers are at that point.

With such dismal nest eggs, what do all these retirees plan on for cash flow in the golden years? According to the IRI’s report, as of this year, half the boomers surveyed cited Social Security as a major expected source of income during retirement. Perhaps that’s why Get What’s Yours, a book on maximizing Social Security checks, holds a top spot on Amazon for retirement books.

While these statistics make me anxious, apparently boomers in general still aren’t worried about life after working. The study also gauged boomers’ retirement expectations compared with those of their parents and revealed that almost half those surveyed believed that financially they will be about as well off, even better off, than their parents in the later years.

About half also somehow imagined that enough dollars will remain in their retirement budget for basic expenses and some left over for travel and leisure. This tells me that too many boomers need a reality check.

The survey did contain some good news. The IRI looked into the retirement preparedness of boomers who work with financial advisors versus those who go at it alone. Those who worked with a financial advisor were almost twice as likely to have at least $100,000 saved.

Those who worked with an advisor seem more conscious of retirement savings. Another good rule of thumb I learned from my research: Spend at least five hours a year planning for your future retirement. Rather than guessing, ignoring or hoping your retirement will be better than your parents’, put in the time planning.

Ultimately, boomers need more realistic expectations for post-work life – and, if they don’t like that reality, a strategy to change their future. With that generation as with all others, it’s up to all of us individually to make retirement work.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq

Wes Moss, CFP, is the chief investment strategist for Capital Investment Advisors and a partner at Wela, both in Atlanta. He hosts “Money Matters,” a live financial advice show on Atlanta’s News 95-5 and AM 750 WSB Radio. In 2015 and 2014 Barron’s Magazine named him as one of America’s top 1,200 Financial Advisors. His newly released book, You Can Retire Sooner Than You Think published by McGraw Hill, is available on Amazon, iTunes and at your local bookstore.

Wes writes weekly about personal finance in the “Bargain Hunter Section” for AJC.com, the site of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Wes is also the editor and writer for About.com’s Personal Finance blog. Connect with Wes on Twitter at @WesMoss365 and on Facebook at Wes Moss Money Matters. You can also visit his website, WesMoss.com to learn more about Wes, and take his complimentary Money and Happiness Quiz.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 
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Are you one of the largest generation in American history? Comfortable with how much you have saved for retirement? Comfort is one thing, reality another, and boomers may be running of time to work on the financial quality of post-work life.

A recent study from the Insured Retirement Institute (IRI) surveyed 803 baby boomers ages 52 to 68 on expectations for retirement. I was shocked that the overall “economic satisfaction” for boomers dropped to a five-year low of 48%. I assume that the economic satisfaction they refer to equates to a financial comfort zone: enough savings and income for retirement.

Between 2011 and 2013, the satisfaction levels averaged 77% before falling to 65% in 2014. The numbers tanked 17 more percentage points this year, meaning that over half of America’s boomers are dissatisfied with their financial situation as they either prepare for or enter retirement.

Looking further, I found a glaring reason behind such gloom: As of this year, only five out of 10 boomer retirees surveyed have any savings, planning instead to rely completely on government benefits, pension income or both. About a third (34%) of respondents have $100,000 or more saved; only 19% maintain $250,000 or more saved for retirement.

According to my research for my book You Can Retire Sooner Than You Think, the tipping point for my happy retirees was $500,000 in liquid net worth (aka, retirement savings). Clearly, only a small fraction of boomers are at that point.

With such dismal nest eggs, what do all these retirees plan on for cash flow in the golden years? According to the IRI’s report, as of this year, half the boomers surveyed cited Social Security as a major expected source of income during retirement. Perhaps that’s why Get What’s Yours, a book on maximizing Social Security checks, holds a top spot on Amazon for retirement books.

While these statistics make me anxious, apparently boomers in general still aren’t worried about life after working. The study also gauged boomers’ retirement expectations compared with those of their parents and revealed that almost half those surveyed believed that financially they will be about as well off, even better off, than their parents in the later years.

About half also somehow imagined that enough dollars will remain in their retirement budget for basic expenses and some left over for travel and leisure. This tells me that too many boomers need a reality check.

The survey did contain some good news. The IRI looked into the retirement preparedness of boomers who work with financial advisors versus those who go at it alone. Those who worked with a financial advisor were almost twice as likely to have at least $100,000 saved.

Those who worked with an advisor seem more conscious of retirement savings. Another good rule of thumb I learned from my research: Spend at least five hours a year planning for your future retirement. Rather than guessing, ignoring or hoping your retirement will be better than your parents’, put in the time planning.

Ultimately, boomers need more realistic expectations for post-work life – and, if they don’t like that reality, a strategy to change their future. With that generation as with all others, it’s up to all of us individually to make retirement work.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq

Wes Moss, CFP, is the chief investment strategist for Capital Investment Advisors and a partner at Wela, both in Atlanta. He hosts “Money Matters,” a live financial advice show on Atlanta’s News 95-5 and AM 750 WSB Radio. In 2015 and 2014 Barron’s Magazine named him as one of America’s top 1,200 Financial Advisors. His newly released book, You Can Retire Sooner Than You Think published by McGraw Hill, is available on Amazon, iTunes and at your local bookstore.

Wes writes weekly about personal finance in the “Bargain Hunter Section” for AJC.com, the site of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Wes is also the editor and writer for About.com’s Personal Finance blog. Connect with Wes on Twitter at @WesMoss365 and on Facebook at Wes Moss Money Matters. You can also visit his website, WesMoss.com to learn more about Wes, and take his complimentary Money and Happiness Quiz.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 
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Simon Innvaer, 87 http://sunpatriot.com/2015/07/31/simon-innvaer-87/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/07/31/simon-innvaer-87/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 18:26:12 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=55230 Simon    Innvaer, 87

Simon Innvaer age 87 of Waconia passed away Sunday, July 26th, 2015 at Ridgeview Medical Center in Waconia. Simon Innvaer was born September 7th, 1927 in Haugesund, Norway, the son of Simon and Hanna (Gaasland) Innvaer. He was baptized at Bremnes Kirke on 10-30-1927 in Bremnes, Norway. Simon attended the University of Trondheim, Norway and graduated with a degree in Diesel and Mechanical Engineering. On July 19th, 1952, Simon was united in marriage to Nancy M. Ostensen at Bremnes Kirke in Bremnes, Norway.
Simon and Nancy immigrated to the United States in 1954, initially to New York but soon relocated to Minnesota and resided in Minneapolis. Simon worked in mining and manufacturing and after a few years, and 3 children, the family moved to Wisconsin when he went to work for Allis Chalmers Mining division, designing and building ore processing plants. His work took him all over the world and in 1968 he took his family with him to Sweden while he built a plant near Kiruna, above the Arctic Circle. Since all of the extended family lived overseas the family spent many summers traveling to Norway and spending time with relatives. When Simon realized his family had not seen very much of the United States he decided we needed to spend the next two summers taking camping trips to explore the northwest and then east through Canada and the east coast. Very American with the popup camper and the station wagon. Simon and Nancy continued to travel throughout their life, making it to all 50 states and many foreign lands.
Simon was a true engineer, always designing interesting contraptions as well as designing all three homes that they built. Simon was very active and greatly enjoyed taking his grandson with him on sailing, boating, and other adventures. He was very proud of all his children and grandchildren. He spent many hours watching his grandchildren play soccer and offering tips!
Simon and Nancy became citizens on 12/21/66 and while proud to be Americans, they were equally proud of their Norwegian heritage. They joined Sons of Norway while living in Wisconsin, and then again after moving back to Minnesota. Simon was also active with the Torske Klubben and the Norwegian American Technical Society.
Simon was preceded in death by his parents Simon and Hanna Innvaer; his in-laws Henrik and Johanne Saeverud; brothers Anders, Jens, Peder, Ragnvald and Harald Innvaer; sisters Marianne Holmen and Anna Sortland.
Simon is survived by his loving family; wife Nancy, children Jan Olav (Judy) Innvaer of Blaine, Liv Kari (Diego) Martinez of Buckeye, AZ, Stein Harald (Lisa) Innvaer of Courtland, and Heidi Innvaer of Waconia; grandchildren Elizabeth (Jaron) Aune, Katie (Sebastian) Muffolini, Peter (Chloe) Innvaer, Kari Knowlton, Eric (Kati) Knowlton, Danielle and Nicole Martinez, Hannah and Leah Innvaer, and Jan-Henrik Innvaer; great-grandchildren Kaden Aune, Maliki, Karis and Ezekiel Knowlton; Sisters Liv Sortland and Edit (Magne) Haaleraker; many nephews, nieces, other relatives and friends.

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Your Mid-Year $$ Checkup http://sunpatriot.com/2015/07/31/your-mid-year-checkup/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/07/31/your-mid-year-checkup/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 16:30:51 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?guid=41a8ac18ef2d6354e8c7fb89e7abea86 This time of year marks a great moment to slow down and look at your financial progress in 2015. How are you tracking against goals you set in January, and do you have an opportunity to save more, give to a cause or reduce this year’s taxes? Examine financial goals you set earlier this year, focusing on each major aspect of your money plan.

Here are a few tips:

Review 401(k) contributions. The limit to what you can kick in to your workplace retirement plan increased to $18,000 this year ($24,000 if you’re older than 50). Look at your year-to-date numbers to make sure you remain on track to maximize contributions.

In addition to helping increase your account balance, maxing out contributions can also reduce your taxable income (see below).

Boost savings. With less than half a year to go, review your current savings and consider boosting your recurring contribution even a small amount. And true, while summer can drain your finances – vacation trips, kids out of school, additional entertainment – challenge yourself to spend less and save more.

Your tactic might be as simple as buying one fewer cups of coffee a day or opting for a home-cooked meal instead of an expensive dinner out.

Cut more fees. Maybe you already examined all your pesky credit card and bank fees earlier this year. Note: Banks change rules often, and you may learn that you now shell out for a new or hidden fee on something previously free. Every fee you pay means less money in your pocket.

See how many fees you can reduce or eliminate before the end of the year; consider re-investing those rescued dollars in a savings or retirement account.

Remember taxes. The next filing date for most of us is still months off, so we aren’t quite ready to talk in detail about taxes yet. You should still put yourself in the best financial position now for when the day comes.

Get (or remain) in touch with your certified public accountant to discuss your 2015 estimate. You still have plenty of time left in the year to mitigate tax consequences – almost certainly resulting in a healthier bottom line next year. Your possible moves include adjusting how much tax you have withheld from your paycheck or how much you contribute to your workplace retirement plan.

Give to others. Speaking of what you owe the government, charitable giving makes a great way to minimize taxes and contribute to your favorite cause; Americans gave a total of $358 billion to charity last year, up more than 7% from 2013, according to National Philanthropic Trust. You may also want to check with your employer about a program for matching donations.

Get to know your investments again. While I am a big proponent of the buy-and-hold strategy and letting investments be, now may be a good time to keenly re-examine your portfolio with an eye to determining your appetite for risk.

How much risk do you need to take to reach your financial goals? You might find out that although you can tolerate – even enjoy – intense risk, you don’t need to take it.

Even if you’re not completely on track today, there’s still plenty of 2015 left to focus on financial goals.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Taylor Schulte, CFP, is founder and chief executive officer of Define Financial in San Diego, responsible for company’s vision, strategy and execution. He specializes in helping individuals, families and small business achieve their financial goals, from investment management, financial and retirement planning to charitable giving, college planning and insurance services. While he works with a wide range of clients, Schulte has a keen understanding of the millennial generation’s financial needs and a progressive, forward-thinking approach. Schulte was recently honored with the 2015 Five Star Wealth Manager Award, a recognition limited to fewer than one in 20 wealth managers in San Diego. He also regularly contributes to the San Diego Downtown News.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

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This time of year marks a great moment to slow down and look at your financial progress in 2015. How are you tracking against goals you set in January, and do you have an opportunity to save more, give to a cause or reduce this year’s taxes? Examine financial goals you set earlier this year, focusing on each major aspect of your money plan.

Here are a few tips:

Review 401(k) contributions. The limit to what you can kick in to your workplace retirement plan increased to $18,000 this year ($24,000 if you’re older than 50). Look at your year-to-date numbers to make sure you remain on track to maximize contributions.

In addition to helping increase your account balance, maxing out contributions can also reduce your taxable income (see below).

Boost savings. With less than half a year to go, review your current savings and consider boosting your recurring contribution even a small amount. And true, while summer can drain your finances – vacation trips, kids out of school, additional entertainment – challenge yourself to spend less and save more.

Your tactic might be as simple as buying one fewer cups of coffee a day or opting for a home-cooked meal instead of an expensive dinner out.

Cut more fees. Maybe you already examined all your pesky credit card and bank fees earlier this year. Note: Banks change rules often, and you may learn that you now shell out for a new or hidden fee on something previously free. Every fee you pay means less money in your pocket.

See how many fees you can reduce or eliminate before the end of the year; consider re-investing those rescued dollars in a savings or retirement account.

Remember taxes. The next filing date for most of us is still months off, so we aren’t quite ready to talk in detail about taxes yet. You should still put yourself in the best financial position now for when the day comes.

Get (or remain) in touch with your certified public accountant to discuss your 2015 estimate. You still have plenty of time left in the year to mitigate tax consequences – almost certainly resulting in a healthier bottom line next year. Your possible moves include adjusting how much tax you have withheld from your paycheck or how much you contribute to your workplace retirement plan.

Give to others. Speaking of what you owe the government, charitable giving makes a great way to minimize taxes and contribute to your favorite cause; Americans gave a total of $358 billion to charity last year, up more than 7% from 2013, according to National Philanthropic Trust. You may also want to check with your employer about a program for matching donations.

Get to know your investments again. While I am a big proponent of the buy-and-hold strategy and letting investments be, now may be a good time to keenly re-examine your portfolio with an eye to determining your appetite for risk.

How much risk do you need to take to reach your financial goals? You might find out that although you can tolerate – even enjoy – intense risk, you don’t need to take it.

Even if you’re not completely on track today, there’s still plenty of 2015 left to focus on financial goals.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Taylor Schulte, CFP, is founder and chief executive officer of Define Financial in San Diego, responsible for company’s vision, strategy and execution. He specializes in helping individuals, families and small business achieve their financial goals, from investment management, financial and retirement planning to charitable giving, college planning and insurance services. While he works with a wide range of clients, Schulte has a keen understanding of the millennial generation’s financial needs and a progressive, forward-thinking approach. Schulte was recently honored with the 2015 Five Star Wealth Manager Award, a recognition limited to fewer than one in 20 wealth managers in San Diego. He also regularly contributes to the San Diego Downtown News.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

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