Sun Patriot http://sunpatriot.com The Waconia Patriot, Carver County News and Norwood Young America Times Sat, 05 Sep 2015 05:01:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Poll supports school choice, reduced reliance on testing http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/05/poll-supports-school-choice-reduced-reliance-on-testing/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/05/poll-supports-school-choice-reduced-reliance-on-testing/#comments Sat, 05 Sep 2015 05:01:49 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=56109 By Joe Nathan

The 47th annual national Gallup-Phi Delta Kappa poll demonstrates how public and public school parents have fascinating, often complicated, views about public education.
Among other things, the poll reports widespread concerns about an overemphasis on tests, mixed views on “opting out” of testing and strong support for public school choice. The survey, done by Phi Delta Kappa International, a national education group and the respected Gallup organization, was released Aug. 23. It has become part of the nation’s “back to school tradition.”
PDK presented results with the headline, “Testing doesn’t measure up for Americans.” But the actual responses show a more complicated picture.
For example:
• Regarding testing, 64 percent of the public and 67 percent of public school parents think there is “too much emphasis on standardized testing in the public schools in your community, compared to 19 percent of the public nationally, and 20 percent of public school parents, who think there is “about the right amount.”
• However, on whether “all parents with children in the public schools should be allowed to excuse their children from taking one or more tests,” there is a significant split: an estimated 44 percent of the public say no and 41 percent say yes. Among public school parents, 47 percent say yes, 40 percent say no. Furthermore, 59 percent of public school parents said they would not excuse their own child from one or more tests, while 75 percent of African-Americans, 65 percent of Hispanics, and 54 percent of whites said they would not excuse their own child.
So about two-thirds of Americans think there is an overemphasis on standardized tests. But both the public and public school parents are split on whether families should “opt-out.” Most would not do it themselves.
The majority, and vast majority of African-American and Hispanic parents, would not excuse their children from testing. They want to know how their youngsters are doing. They also recognize, I think wisely, that there are other important ways to assess how well students are doing in school.
Part of the poll discusses charter public schools and public school choice:
• 64 percent “favor” the idea of charter schools. That’s up one percent from 2014. Another 25 percent oppose the charter idea, down from 31 percent in 2014.
• 66 percent of public school parents are in favor of the charter idea. That’s up from 55 percent in 2014. Opposition to the charter idea among public school parents has declined from 33 percent in 2014 to 27 percent in 2015.
• 64 percent of Americans, and 67 percent of public school parents, favor the idea of allowing students and their parents “to choose which public schools in their community the students attend, regardless of where they live.”
• Of 11 options presented, public school parents say the three most important factors they use in selecting a school are “quality of the teachers, curriculum (i.e., the courses offered) and the maintenance of student discipline.”
• On a controversial question regarding taxes, only 31 percent of the public and 33 percent of public school parents favor the idea of using tax funds to support enrollment of students at a private school. This approach has been called “only 31.” Voucher advocates say the way the question is asked encourages a negative answer.
This poll suggests there is twice as much support for public school choice, including charter public schools, as there is for using tax funds to support enrollment in private schools.
The poll includes more than two-dozen questions. In addition to what’s discussed above, questions ask, for example, about vaccinations (which more than 80 percent believe should be required before students enter public schools), use of standardized tests to help assess teachers (which the majority oppose), Common Core standards, public ratings of local schools and the biggest problems in public education.
PDK’s presentation of poll results also includes comments from five mothers, most of whom have concerns about testing.
Gallup and PDK report that the findings came from a “nationally representative web survey of 3,499 Americans, ages 18 and older with Internet access and an additional telephone survey of 1,001 Americans, ages 18 and older.” Poll results are available here: http://bit.ly/1PMtDxs.

Joe Nathan, formerly a Minnesota public school teacher, administrator and PTA president, directs the Center for School Change. Reactions are welcome atjoe@centerforschoolchange.org. ]]> http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/05/poll-supports-school-choice-reduced-reliance-on-testing/feed/ 0 Labor Day and Its Meaning http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/labor-day-and-its-meaning/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/labor-day-and-its-meaning/#comments Fri, 04 Sep 2015 20:02:15 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?guid=0bc317d3c0fe4f0ad1a46e10d5146bf5 The national holiday we celebrate on Monday is a good time for reflection on why we work and what we derive from it. The answer should be that it gives your life energy and meaning. If it doesn’t, you should change that.

Labor Day marks the unofficial end of summer. Summer trips wind down, students leave for college and football season gears up. In the South particularly, where I live, we anticipate the cooler days of fall with enthusiasm. The long weekend is marked for rest and recreation as we ponder the meaning and significance of labor and work.

The Central Labor Union organized the first Labor Day in 1882. Aimed at promoting trade unions, parades and festivals amused workers and their families. Labor Day became a federal holiday in 1894, a welcome addition to fill the gap between Independence Day and Thanksgiving.

Most agree that meaningful work is a major component of human well being. It does not matter whether the work is paid, volunteer or pro- bono, or work at home to nurture a family. Work matters.

A human being without purpose is a lost soul. “A life well-lived” is the stuff of advertising, self-help books and the psychiatrist’s couch. The scientists at the Gallup organization have been exploring the subject since the mid-20th century. A not-so-startling finding: Our happiness and feelings of well-being are a function of liking what we do each day.

As Tom Rath and Jim Harter explain in their book, Well Being: The Five Essential Elements (Gallup Press, 2010), “At a fundamental level, we all need something to do, and ideally something to look forward to, when we wake up each day. What you spend your day doing each day shapes your identity, whether you are a student, parent, volunteer, retiree or have a more conventional job.”

That makes sense. Yet only 20% gave a strong “yes” when Gallup researchers asked over and over, “Do you like what you do each day?”  If 80% are unhappy with daily activities, the rest of their life is likely to be out of whack. Certainly, financial well-being will suffer; so will physical, social and community well-being.

Ask someone what well-being means to them and most, guys especially, will focus on money and physical fitness. But if you are to successfully navigate a life transition, relationships and social connections, and your sense of place, that you are where you belong in terms of where you live and work and interact with friends and people, and your spiritual home, are key components of well-being. In other words, career, financial, physical, social, and community well-being are part of a balanced continuum.

Authors Rath and Harter also wrote the national bestseller, StrengthsFinder 2.0. Propaganda extolling workers, plus many union labels and graphics, incorporate symbols of strength. StrengthsFinder, personal introspection widely applied in business and churches, indicates that, when well-being suffers, when you are unhappy with your day, you are not applying your strengths. You may have a job or assigned task, but are you in the right role?

When you reinforce God-given talent with knowledge and skill, you have a strength. A talent is a naturally recurring pattern of thought, feeling or behavior productively applied. A skill is the ability to move through the fundamental steps of a task. Knowledge is what we know.

A strength, then, is a powerful, productive combination of talent, skill and knowledge. When you are doing anything from strength, you feel it, you know it, and you love it. Boredom and frustration have no place in your day.

This Labor Day weekend, if you want to recalibrate and infuse your life with new energy, a revitalized sense of purpose, and a sense of holistic well-being, read the these two short but powerful books.

Take the assessment offered and then talk to an advisor familiar with the StrengthsFinder process. Financial advisors focused on life transitions planning increasingly are using diagnostics and alliances with coaches to increase their own sense of well-being, along with that of their clients.

Winifred Holtby (1898-1935) was an English novelist and journalist, best known for her novel South Riding. Her epitaph reads, “God give me work, till my life shall end, And life, till my work is done.” After you say grace at your Labor Day picnic, add Winifred’s prayer to your wishes and resolutions.

Happy Labor Day.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Lewis Walker, CFP, is president of Walker Capital Managemen, LCC in Peachtree Corners, Ga. Securities and certain advisory services offered through The Strategic Financial Alliance Inc. (SFA). Lewis Walker and Mike Hostetler are registered representatives of the SFA, which is otherwise unaffiliated with Walker Capital Management. 770-441-2603. lewisw@theinvestmentcoach.com.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

 

 

 

 

]]> The national holiday we celebrate on Monday is a good time for reflection on why we work and what we derive from it. The answer should be that it gives your life energy and meaning. If it doesn’t, you should change that.

Labor Day marks the unofficial end of summer. Summer trips wind down, students leave for college and football season gears up. In the South particularly, where I live, we anticipate the cooler days of fall with enthusiasm. The long weekend is marked for rest and recreation as we ponder the meaning and significance of labor and work.

The Central Labor Union organized the first Labor Day in 1882. Aimed at promoting trade unions, parades and festivals amused workers and their families. Labor Day became a federal holiday in 1894, a welcome addition to fill the gap between Independence Day and Thanksgiving.

Most agree that meaningful work is a major component of human well being. It does not matter whether the work is paid, volunteer or pro- bono, or work at home to nurture a family. Work matters.

A human being without purpose is a lost soul. “A life well-lived” is the stuff of advertising, self-help books and the psychiatrist’s couch. The scientists at the Gallup organization have been exploring the subject since the mid-20th century. A not-so-startling finding: Our happiness and feelings of well-being are a function of liking what we do each day.

As Tom Rath and Jim Harter explain in their book, Well Being: The Five Essential Elements (Gallup Press, 2010), “At a fundamental level, we all need something to do, and ideally something to look forward to, when we wake up each day. What you spend your day doing each day shapes your identity, whether you are a student, parent, volunteer, retiree or have a more conventional job.”

That makes sense. Yet only 20% gave a strong “yes” when Gallup researchers asked over and over, “Do you like what you do each day?”  If 80% are unhappy with daily activities, the rest of their life is likely to be out of whack. Certainly, financial well-being will suffer; so will physical, social and community well-being.

Ask someone what well-being means to them and most, guys especially, will focus on money and physical fitness. But if you are to successfully navigate a life transition, relationships and social connections, and your sense of place, that you are where you belong in terms of where you live and work and interact with friends and people, and your spiritual home, are key components of well-being. In other words, career, financial, physical, social, and community well-being are part of a balanced continuum.

Authors Rath and Harter also wrote the national bestseller, StrengthsFinder 2.0. Propaganda extolling workers, plus many union labels and graphics, incorporate symbols of strength. StrengthsFinder, personal introspection widely applied in business and churches, indicates that, when well-being suffers, when you are unhappy with your day, you are not applying your strengths. You may have a job or assigned task, but are you in the right role?

When you reinforce God-given talent with knowledge and skill, you have a strength. A talent is a naturally recurring pattern of thought, feeling or behavior productively applied. A skill is the ability to move through the fundamental steps of a task. Knowledge is what we know.

A strength, then, is a powerful, productive combination of talent, skill and knowledge. When you are doing anything from strength, you feel it, you know it, and you love it. Boredom and frustration have no place in your day.

This Labor Day weekend, if you want to recalibrate and infuse your life with new energy, a revitalized sense of purpose, and a sense of holistic well-being, read the these two short but powerful books.

Take the assessment offered and then talk to an advisor familiar with the StrengthsFinder process. Financial advisors focused on life transitions planning increasingly are using diagnostics and alliances with coaches to increase their own sense of well-being, along with that of their clients.

Winifred Holtby (1898-1935) was an English novelist and journalist, best known for her novel South Riding. Her epitaph reads, “God give me work, till my life shall end, And life, till my work is done.” After you say grace at your Labor Day picnic, add Winifred’s prayer to your wishes and resolutions.

Happy Labor Day.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Lewis Walker, CFP, is president of Walker Capital Managemen, LCC in Peachtree Corners, Ga. Securities and certain advisory services offered through The Strategic Financial Alliance Inc. (SFA). Lewis Walker and Mike Hostetler are registered representatives of the SFA, which is otherwise unaffiliated with Walker Capital Management. 770-441-2603. lewisw@theinvestmentcoach.com.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

 

 

 

 

]]>
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Volleyball team wants to redefine what it is to be ‘Royal’ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/volleyball-team-wants-to-redefine-what-it-is-to-be-royal/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/volleyball-team-wants-to-redefine-what-it-is-to-be-royal/#comments Fri, 04 Sep 2015 19:51:57 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=56204 Head coach:
Andrea Raser
The Royals volleyball seniors, from left: Katelyn Yliniemi, Carly Willette, Victoria Lynch, Paige Wegner and Megan Kreatz. (Photo by Ethan Groothuis)
The Royals volleyball seniors, from left: Katelyn Yliniemi, Carly Willette, Victoria Lynch, Paige Wegner and Megan Kreatz. (Photo by Ethan Groothuis)

Assistant coaches:
Ashley Neaton, Kelley Hanson
Recap of last season:
We had a large varsity team and nine seniors who wanted to have a great season, however we had a really hard time last year coming together as a team. We started the season off very strong, but our team lacked consistency of play and consistency of mental toughness. We also spent the first half of the season with 2 starting players out with injuries.
Returning starters:
Katelyn Yliniemi, Victoria Lynch, Paige Wegner, Megan Kreatz, Madissen Burns
Captains:
Katelyn Yliniemi, Victoria Lynch
Conference outlook and favorites:
We are in a new, well old-but new again, conference this year. We have moved back to the WCC – which is now split into East and West, we are in the WCC – West. The WCC-West is a conference full of teams that play hard and compete. DC, GSL, NLS, Annandale are some teams who tend to come to mind first, but that is not to take anything away from other conference teams.
Section outlook and favorites:
We are also in a new section this year and we are still familiarizing ourselves with all of the teams, but Concordia Academy has a long history of good volleyball.
Team goals and expectations:
This 2015 team will need to redefine what it means to be a Royal. They will work hard and compete against any team. What will make the difference this year for these players is consistency and resiliency and being able to play as a team. Overall, this is a mentally tough team with great senior leadership and players that want to be a great team.
Key losses:
Ashley Vealetzek was an All-State player.
Strengths:
Leadership, competitiveness, drive, positive culture
Areas of improvement needed:
Consistency, resiliency
Final thoughts:
We are looking forward to a new season with new players, new attitudes, new vision, new conference, and a new section. ]]> http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/volleyball-team-wants-to-redefine-what-it-is-to-be-royal/feed/ 0 Waconia volleyball falls to Totino Grace http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/waconia-volleyball-falls-to-totino-grace/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/waconia-volleyball-falls-to-totino-grace/#comments Fri, 04 Sep 2015 19:00:06 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=56155 The youthful Waconia team started off slow, but rallied to push Totino Grace in the final two sets. The Wildcats ultimately lost the match, falling 11-25, 18-25 and 24-26.
“We started out like a young team against a veteran squad and gradually got more comfortable as the match went on,” said coach Jim Lee. “The girls’ serve receive was very impressive; now we just need to execute our side out efficiency at a higher level. Jasmine Yanik and Danielle Pioske played great back row and Kali Wolf and Taylor Wolf hit very effectively throughout the night.”
Taylor Wolf led the team in kills (11), assists (17) and aces (3).
Yanik and Pioske both tallied double-digit digs, recording 15 and 12 respectively.
Mikayla Williams added eight kills, while Kali Wolf had six.

Contact James Stitt at james.stitt@ecm-inc.com ]]> http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/waconia-volleyball-falls-to-totino-grace/feed/ 0 THANK YOU http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/thank-you-25/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/thank-you-25/#comments Fri, 04 Sep 2015 18:29:13 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=56247 Many thanks to the Hamburg Fire Department and ambulance service and the neighbors for being there when I needed them during my mishap at home.
Also thanks to the Ridgeview Hospital emergency staff.
Marlen "Winky" Wichelman
June Wichelman ]]>
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IN MEMORY http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/in-memory-15/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/in-memory-15/#comments Fri, 04 Sep 2015 18:28:57 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=56244 In Loving Memory of Ardell Wolter
Who Passed Away One Year on Sept. 8, 2014

As our dear dad and our grandpa too,
There are many memories we have of you.
You taught us love, and how to be a friend,
You were always there for us to the very end.
A better person would be hard to find,
And in your heart, you were always kind.
We miss your smile, your joking ways,
We miss the thing you used to say.
And when old times we do recall,
It's then we miss you most of all.
Our only consolation is knowing you are in heaven, a better place.
Where we will be together again, when we end our earthly race.

Sadly Missed by Your Children and Grandchildren ]]> http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/in-memory-15/feed/ 0 IN MEMORY http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/in-memory-14/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/in-memory-14/#comments Fri, 04 Sep 2015 18:28:37 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=56241 IN MEMORY

Chrissy Johnson
1972-2000
Killed by a drunk driver
We remember the kindness that you gave us!
In our hearts that so feel this agony we cannot hold you no more we will always embrace your memory.
Love your daughter Jennie, dad and mom Steve and Sharon, sister Lisa, personal friend Jeff,best friend Mary and many other family and friends. ]]> http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/in-memory-14/feed/ 0 Rick & Mel Kroells http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/rick-mel-kroells/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/rick-mel-kroells/#comments Fri, 04 Sep 2015 18:28:23 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=56238 Open House
Wedding Celebrations
Honoring
Rick & Mel Kroells
Sat., Sept. 19, 2015
2-6 p.m.
Willkommen Pavilion
21 Main St. E.
NYA ]]>
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Rudella Anna (Hoernemann) VonBerge, 100 http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/rudella-anna-hoernemann-vonberge-100/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/rudella-anna-hoernemann-vonberge-100/#comments Fri, 04 Sep 2015 18:26:19 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=56235 Rudella   Anna  (Hoernemann) VonBerge, 100

Rudella Anna (Hoernemann) VonBerge, 100, of Glencoe, formerly of Colorado Springs, Colo., passed away Monday, Aug. 31, at Glencoe Regional Health Services Long Term Care in Glencoe.
Rudella Anna (Hoernemann) VonBerge was born on May 4, 1915, in Bergen Township, McLeod County near Plato. She was the daughter of Peter and Katherine (Feltmann) Hoernemann. Rudella was baptized as an infant on May 23, 1915, at her home and was later confirmed in her faith as a youth on March 24, 1929, by Rev. E. U. Hafermann at County Line Church (Frieden's United Church of Christ) in rural Norwood Young America. She received her education at a country school near Plato.
On June 6, 1939, Rudella was united in marriage to Ray VonBerge by Rev. E. U. Hafemann at County Line Church (Frieden's United Church of Christ) in rural Norwood Young America. Rudella and Ray made their home in Norwood Young America and then in 1953, they moved to Colorado Springs, Colo. In March of 2012, Rudella returned to Glencoe and in April became a resident of Glencoe Regional Health Services Long Term Care. Rudella and Ray shared over 66 years of marriage, until Ray passed away on February 4, 2006.
In addition to being a loving wife and homemaker, Rudella did sewing, mending and house sitting for others. She was a member of First Presbyterian Church in Colorado Springs, Colo.
Rudella and Ray were very happy in Colorado Springs, where they loved spending time with their friends. Rudella enjoyed getting mail and talking on the telephone. She was a great seamstress, loved to quilt, travel and provide other women with her beautician talents. Rudella especially cherished the time spent with her family and friends.
Rudella passed away on Monday, Aug. 31, at Glencoe Regional Health Services Long Term Care in Glencoe at the age of 100 years, 3 months and 28 days.
Blessed be her memory.
Rudella is survived by her sister-in-law, Geraldine Hoernemann of Lester Prairie; nieces and nephews, Barbara Halloran, Brenda Sauter, Lona Oltmann, Wendy Anderson, Steven Hoernemann, Sue Ann Fynewever, Michael Hoernemann, Dorothy Ittel, Leroy VonBerge, Harold VonBerge, Marlene Kroells and Ray Graupmann; other relatives and many friends.
Rudella is preceded in death by her parents, Peter and Katherine Hoernemann; husband, Ray VonBerge; four brothers, Earl Hoernemann and his wife, Elda, Marvin Hoernemann, Elmer Hoernemann, Orville Hoernemann and his wife, Myra; and nieces, Carol Heuer, Helen Dettmann and Lois Majestic.
Funeral services were held Thursday, Sept. 3, at 5 p.m., at Johnson-McBride Funeral Chapel in Glencoe, with interment at Memorial Gardens Cemetery in Colorado Springs, Colo. Rev. Brian Brosz and Rev. Joseph Clay officiated the service. Songs included Ray's Song To Rudella "Let Me Call You Sweetheart," duet Emalee Smith and Jeffrey Zander singing "Amazing Grace" and congregational hymns "When The Roll Is Called Up Yonder" and "Beyond The Sunset." Honorary casket bearers were Michael Hoernemann, Steven Hoernemann, Travis Oltmann and Curtis Sauter.
Memorials preferred to Deacons Fund at First Presbyterian Church, 219 East Bijou Street, Colorado Springs, Colo., 80903-1392 or Allina Hospice, 211 Freemont Ave. SE, Hutchinson, 55350.
Arrangements by the Johnson-McBride Funeral Chapel of Glencoe. Online obituaries and guest book are available at www.hantge.com.

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Myrtle A. Schuettpelz, 89 http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/myrtle-a-schuettpelz-89/ http://sunpatriot.com/2015/09/04/myrtle-a-schuettpelz-89/#comments Fri, 04 Sep 2015 18:25:48 +0000 http://sunpatriot.com/?p=56232 Myrtle   A.  Schuettpelz, 89

Myrtle A. Schuettpelz, age 89, of Mayer, passed away Monday, August 31, 2015, at St. Mary's Care Center in Winsted, Minn.
A funeral service is Friday, September 4, 2015, at 11 a.m. at Zion Lutheran Church in Mayer, Minn., with the Rev. Adam Gless officiating. Visitation is from 9:30 a.m. until the time of the service at the church on Friday. Interment will be at Zion Lutheran Cemetery.
Myrtle was born on January 27, 1926, in Waconia Twp., the daughter of Carl and Mathilda (Gennrich) Prehn. She was baptized on February 26, 1926, at Trinity Lutheran Church in Waconia by the Rev. William Schneider and confirmed on March 17, 1940, at Zion Lutheran Church in Mayer by the Rev. Elmer Schwandt. On June 4, 1946, Myrtle was united in marriage to Omer H. Schuettpelz at Zion Lutheran Church in Mayer by the Rev. Elmer Schwandt.
Myrtle loved family gatherings, never missing an anniversary or birthday for anyone in the family. She and Omer enjoyed taking bus trips to many different destinations. Myrtle was always taking pictures of the family, which are a treasure to have for great memories. She had the same group of women that went for coffee in the morning on a regular basis. Myrtle like putting puzzles together, playing solitaire, needle-point and crocheting. One of her favorite activities was going out to eat at many different restaurants.
Myrtle is preceded in death by her husband, Omer; parents, Carl and Mathilda Prehn; son-in-law, Scott Berry; and sister, Bernice Quaas.
Myrtle is survived by her loving family: daughters and son-in-law, Carol and the Rev. Don Luedke of Ft. Wayne, Indiana, and Sharon Berry of Lester Prairie; grandchildren, Brett Luedke, Tara and Andy Korsmo, David and Robin Berry, Annette and Wade Stock, Aimee Wilder and friend Shawn Solvavong, Justin and Natalie Berry; great-grandchildren, Emilie, Garrett and Wyatt Berry, Craig Becker, Cody and Chase Stock, James Wilder and friend Sam, Tony Wilder and friend Ashley, Jevyn Berry, Tyler, Blake and Chase Korsmo; great-great-grandchildren, Aidan, Mason and Sydney; sister; Gladys Pederson of Norwood; nieces, nephews, and other relatives and friends.
Casket-bearers will be grandchildren David Berry, Annette Stock, Aimee Wilder, Justin Berry, Brett Luedke and Tara Korsmo.
Arrangements by the Johnson Funeral Home in Waconia. www.johnsonfh.com

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