Nature Notes

By Jim Gilbert It’s time to see tundra swans overhead and to hear their muffled musical whistles — a wonderful sign of fall. They are coming from their summer nesting range that is mainly north of the Arctic Circle. Large numbers pause briefly each fall on lakes and rivers in the Great Lakes area before […]

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By Jm Gilbert As a bird flaps its wings, it disturbs the air and leaves whirling eddies behind. Some gregarious species, such as the Canada goose, have learned to take advantage of the upward disturbed air created off the wings of others in the flock by flying in a wedge or V-formation. Each bird thus […]

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By Jim Gilbert It’s the time of the illuminated woods, but beautiful fall foliage colors can also be seen along city boulevards, in yards and gardens, and even on the sides of some buildings where Boston ivy vines display handsome red leaves. Millions of people drive many miles on autumn weekends to see New England’s […]

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For 40 years I have watched for and expected to see the first dark-eyed juncos, also called snowbirds, on or close to Sept. 25. The first ones have never failed to appear at this time. It’s reassuring to see them, each year, appear at the end of September even if they signal the end of […]

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By Jim Gilbert When young spiders emerge from their eggs they already are adults in miniature. The mother spider cares for her eggs and watches over her newly hatched young with as much diligence as the more sophisticated mammals. It might appear that there are more spiders in August than in early summer because they […]

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